Why I Started Blogging About Personal Finance

Why I Started Blogging About Personal FinanceNote: This post was written in 2012 by the previous owner of this blog.

I started blogging about a month ago and I think I’m addicted.  I love sharing and receiving information about personal finance and I’ve met a lot of very talented people through the Yakezie network.  I enjoy reading blogs from like-minded people and sharing information and tips around wealth creation.

What was the trigger to begin blogging?

For years, I’ve read personal finance blogs and stayed current with the most recent financial advice.  I frequented the big PF blogs (GRS, Simple Dollar, FMF, etc) and enjoyed the content.  I often took their advice and it has paid off handsomely.

What began to happen is that my income and net worth began to diverge from the core audience of these particular sites.  Subsequently, their advice was not always relevant to me. Reading about saving money by cutting hair at home or making laundry detergent wasn’t a good investment of my time. Even saving $50 here and there wasn’t interesting to me any more. I found myself craving for information to make my assets grow, create passive income, and to find ways to save on big expenses.

I’ve always been the go-to person for financial advice, mainly because I would leverage the advice that I read on most personal finance blogs. People found the advice practical and useful, so I thought I could share this with a broader audience through a blog.

Other reasons I began blogging is to hold myself accountable for the advice on the site, to network with like-minded people, improve my writing, and learn more about personal finance. What will bring me ultimate joy is to see someone’s life transform because of the information on the site or better yet, enter into the 1% club.

Why the name?

I chose the name “I Am 1 Percent” because of the recent activism against the 1% of income earners in America. I know that there are many people in this category or close to this category that worked hard to attain their wealth and are doing practical things to preserve that wealth.

I strongly believe that the economy is not a fixed pie. One’s success is not at the expense of someone else. If wealth was not created and the economy was a fixed pie, our GDP would not be growing. Since it typically does grow year after year, outside of a recession, it is proof that the pie grows too.

About The Author

Edwin is a marketer, social media influencer and head writer here at I Am 1 Percent. He manages a large network of high quality finance blogs and social media accounts. You can connect with him via email here.


18 Comments

  1. Matt @ RamblingFever Money

    No sense in regretting not starting sooner. Can’t undo what wasn’t done. Forget the past and look forward to the future, as many of us who are following your blog look forward to reading what you have to say.

    Reply
    1. iam1percent

      Matt, thanks for the advice…I’m focused now on providing really good content for the readers…

      Reply
  2. Poor to Rich a Day at a Time

    Awwwwww now I feel bad I make my own laundry soap and hubby cuts my hair at home 🙁 KIDDING I may be poor right now but dang it I won’t hold that against you I promise! Matter of fact you want to come for coffee? LOL I love your blog and it truly inspires me!

    Reply
    1. iam1percent

      If you live near NJ, I’d love to come over for coffee! Thanks for being a regular reader..I really appreciate your engagement and insight…

      Reply
  3. PK

    So… will you be sharing recipes on how to make your own detergent? No?

    I’m glad you’ve been writing – I love your stuff so far!

    Reply
    1. iam1percent

      Thanks PK! Love your stuff too!

      Reply
  4. Leigh

    I totally agree with you! I still skim GRS, I read The Simple Dollar once every few weeks (I particularly enjoy the mailbags), and I mostly read FMF for the reader profiles.

    I actually did have a prepaid cell phone until last year because that was what worked best for my situation, but I’m not looking to spend $200/month on rent and have 5 roommates – that simply wouldn’t make me happy. I’m also not your typical recent college graduate – I have a good salary and no student debt. So that, in a way, takes me out of the category of many 20-something personal finance bloggers as well because my priorities are just completely different. For the most part, I don’t care about saving $5/month on something if that extra $5/month makes my life easier.

    I spend so much time thinking about finances though and having my blog as an outlet for these thoughts has been amazing. I actually wrote a post about this recently as well: http://leightpf.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/how-blogging-is-helping-me/

    Glad to hear that you’re enjoying blogging as well!

    Reply
    1. iam1percent

      Like you, I also think about my finances to the point that it may be unhealthy. I make a concious effort not to think about it as often or allow it to show externally, but I know it doesn’t always work.

      Reply
  5. Money Infant

    Thanks for starting the blog 1Percent, I’m glad you didn’t wait longer 🙂

    Reply
  6. Nick

    Good stuff. I started blogging (actually posted about this today, too…) because nobody would talk w/ me about money… 🙂

    I also stick with mostly up and coming blogs these days although there are a few oldies but goodies that I frequent.

    Reply
  7. Josh @ Live Well Simply

    Keep writing. You’ve definitely picked a niche market with the theme of one percent. Great posts so far.

    Reply
  8. Dollar D @ The Dollar Disciple

    I’ve really enjoyed your perspective. It’s not often that you get to engage with someone so far outside of your social circles 🙂

    Reply
  9. so

    “I found myself craving for information to make my assets grow, create passive income, and to find ways to save on big expenses. ”

    This. I already save well over 50% of my income, I don’t really need surface articles on how to save $100. Plus, for me, I find that the investments of the 1% (hedge fund investing, private company investing, real estate) tend to be a bit more capital- and research-intensive. “How to Invest in a Private Company” or “How to Buy a Rental Property” are subjects more appropriate for books or long articles than a blog post, in my opinion. You start wanting to know particulars that are too in-depth for single posts or even series of posts…

    Reply
  10. Daisy

    I love blogging. Isn’t it great? So many great people to connect with and blogs to read and content to write. I like your niche – so many of us are nowhere near the 1%, so it’s interesting to read another perspective. Keep it up!

    Reply
    1. iam1percent

      Thanks Daisy! I love your site as well…I’m meeting so many interesting people through the Yakezie network!

      Reply
  11. Jana @ Daily Money Shot

    I think it’s great that you’ve started blogging. In my opinion, the voice of people in your financial situation is underrepresented in blogs. PF blogs are mainly focused on getting out of debt, frugality, and people like me who fall somewhere in a weird gray area. There’s a place for all of us and I think you bring a different perspective to the niche, which is good.

    And you live close by, which is also pretty cool 🙂

    Reply
  12. Investor Junkie

    Glad I have someone in opinion similar to mine. All of the other PF blogs IMHO are boring!

    Reply
    1. iam1percent

      Thanks for visiting! If there is anything in particular that you would like to see, please let me know!

      Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *